The Point: They don’t call Gen Z “Zoomers” for nothing. They’re fast. Faster to try new products and faster to adopt them than other generations, our new research shows.1 To help make launches a success, focus on reaching Gen Z and holding onto them as customers.

Turns out, Gen Z loves novelty. They switch jobs more than any other generation.2 They’d much rather chat via emoji than—yawn!—a voice call.3 And we’ve learned in our latest research, they’re also far more likely than other generations to try new products.

This has major implications for your brand. The stats out there are grim: Brands launch some 30,000+ new products every year—and 95% of those end up failing over time.4

To beat the odds, think seriously about courting Gen Z—expected to surpass Millennials as the biggest consumer base in 20265—for your new product launches. Our latest research reveals interesting insights about Gen Zers’ attitudes towards new products. And it also provides clear signals on how you can best appeal to them.

Zoomers are 20% more likely than other generations to try a new product to see if they would like it more than their current brand or product.6

Woman in jeans and black boots runs across blue rubber ground of a playground, over three large white circle, her pink scarf blowing into frame.

First in line
What’s driving Gen Z’s need for the new? Zoomers (consumers born between 1997-2012) have seen it all—they’re the first true digital natives—the first generation who can’t remember what life was like before the internet. That makes them less attached to particular brands than previous generations—and they’re far more keen on finding new shiny things that will set them apart.

In fact, our research shows that being “first” to try the new product is one of Gen Z’s main motivations for purchasing.1

“Gen Z is the most individualistic and expressive generation we've seen yet,” says Pinterest researcher Alvin Li. “They’re constantly craving new experiences to cultivate their own individuality. And for those reasons, they’re more motivated to buy and consume new products, to discover and express who they are and how they want to show up in society.”

Payoff for brands
And they’re not just more open to trying new products. They buy a lot more new products than other generations. When it comes to new product purchases, Gen Zers have actually bought 80% more new products in the last 12 months compared to other generations, our research shows.1

As the data shows, Gen Z will gladly open up their wallets for items that’ll represent them in an authentic way. For brands, the potential is huge. Brands that connect with Gen Zers may see 14x greater revenue growth opportunity on average with this generation over time versus other generations.6

And on Pinterest, Gen Zers who use our platform are even more new product-obsessed than their peers who don’t use it. Gen Z Pinners adopt new products at 3.7x the rate as Zoomers who aren’t on the platform.1

White man with a tablet device and two smiling white women have a picnic on a striped purple and white blanket on yellow grass. Woman leans into man and reads a book with a red cover. Other woman with a pink notebook and pen. Bowls of assorted colors filled with various snacks.

Mutually beneficial relationship
So what should you know about reaching Generation Z—a big audience that will soon become the biggest—for a new product launch? Here are three things to keep in mind:

Video ads are more likely to capture Gen Z’s attention than other types of marketing. As the first true digital natives, Gen Zers are more likely—16% more likely in fact—to say video ads appeal to them when shopping for new products than other generations.1

Zoomers want to buy from brands that understand their values and preferences. You can connect with them by embracing the channels they live on and highlighting their individual passions through personalization. They’re big—but not monolithic.

Gen Zers use products to help express their unique identity. Having grown up in the most socially open era yet, Gen Zers relish standing out—and using the products they buy to help express who they are.7 You’ll earn points if you use your ad copy and creative to show them how your new product can help them leave their mark.

White arms with black bracelet adjusts knobs on a small keyboard connected to a laptop  on a brown table. Microphone on the table connected to the laptop. People on a couch next to a guitar. Brown hands play a cajón.

A receptive audience
Other brands are finding that Pinterest is a great place to launch new products. Unlike other platforms where people go to vent or flaunt, people often come to Pinterest to discover and buy and try new things. They’re in exactly the right mindset to hear about new products.

Bon V!V knew that when they used Pinterest to launch their sugar-free alcoholic seltzer. The beverage brand’s campaign was toast-worthy. Bon V!V saw 100% full-funnel statistically significant lifts across all five measured metrics: brand and Pin awareness, message association, brand favorability and purchase intent.8

More good news for brands: Pinners in general—not just Gen Zers—are more likely to be the first to try new products compared to people on other platforms. People on Pinterest are 15% more likely to purchase a new product within a week of launch, our research found.1

Act on the insight

01
Launch your new product on Pinterest.
Pinterest ad solutions move people from “want to try” to “going to buy” quickly and efficiently. Visit our advertise page to learn more about our ad formats and tools.

02
Help Gen Zers manifest their best selves.

To reach an audience primed to try new products, make sure you show Zoomers in your ad creative and copy how your products can help them express their unique identity. With 50% of Gen Z on Pinterest, you can reach early adopters at scale.9

03
Tap into Pinterest trends.

People come to Pinterest to find tomorrow’s ideas. Leverage the trends in our 2022 Pinterest Predicts report to connect to help show your audiences how your products fit into their future plans.

Written by ASHISH ARYA

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Footnotes
1

Source: IRI, New product adoption in CPG, Tech, Entertainment and QSR, US, Oct 2021.

2

CareerBuilder, “Millennials or Gen Z: who's doing the most job-hopping?” US, Oct 2021

3

Adobe, “Global emoji trend report,” global, Jun 2021

4

Harvard Business School, “Clay Christensen’s milkshake marketing,” US, Feb 2011

5

InsiderIntelligence, “Generation Z news,” Jul 2021

6

IRI, “Understand me, don’t define me,” US, May 2021

7

McKinsey, “True Gen: Generation Z and its implications for companies,” Nov 2018

8

BON V!V, internal data, 2020

9

Comscore, Plan Metrix, US, Nov 2020