Our favorite creative on Pinterest in 2017

Old Spice Pin
10 of our favorites
  • Campbell’s “Recipe Reality Check”: “Campbell’s knows their target audience: moms who love to be on Pinterest. However, they found that these moms just don’t have the time to make elaborate meals for their families. Enter the Recipe Reality Check, where Campbell’s swapped out complex meals that people had pinned for simpler Campbell’s recipes.”—Raashi Rosenberger, Creative Strategy Lead
  • Toyota RAV4 “4 Second Adventures”: “Many automotive partners focus heavily on car features or simply repurpose their TV commercials. Toyota picked up on the quickly emerging Pinterest trend of car camping, and followed an “experience first, features second” strategy to build out a series of videos highlighting camping near-mishaps that were salvaged because of the RAV4.”—Brad Spychalski, Creative Strategy Lead
  • Cheetos, “Cheetos Museum”“The amazing Cheetos Museum campaign came to life on Pinterest in a cleverly breakthrough way: by aligning the shape of featured Cheetos with what people were searching for. People interested in food, fashion and fitness on Pinterest saw Promoted Video Pins featuring pineapple-, boot- and swimmer-shaped Cheetos. The videos were also created out of still photographs, showing a unique use of the medium on the platform.”—Nancy Jeng, Creative Program Lead
  • The Home Depot “Built-In Pin”: “What could be cooler than stepping inside of a Pin? The creative team worked with 22squared to bring this idea to life for The Home Depot, creating entire rooms from scratch and showcasing the construction via timelapse. This approach made inspiration actionable through an immersive, 360-degree interactive experience that allows users to learn more about the objects built in the room.”—Jason Wire, Creative Strategist
  • Febreze “Breathing Room”: “To launch and establish Febreze on Pinterest, we partnered with Possible and P&G to concept the unexpected moments where Febreze is needed. Through clear headlines, eye-catching illustration and layout within the grid, we were able to transform Febreze from an impulse buy to a home care hero.”—Dan Schunk, Creative Strategist
  • Michaels “Make-It Kits”: “I’m a big fan of the Pinterest and Michaels “Make It Kits” that brought a new Pinterest trend, shibori, to life for Pinners in a totally off-screen product collaboration based on Pinterest insights. We’re excited to see how more retailers integrate Pinterest trends in an actionable, offline context.”—Laurie Berger, Designer
  • Old Spice “DIY”: “One of my favorites from this year stands out for being inventively humorous in addition to driving great results for the brand. For Old Spice, we worked with both Wieden + Kennedy and HonestlyWTF from the Pin Collective to create an irreverent take on DIY culture. This campaign saw massive organic reach due to its Saveability, as well as many comments from Pinners saying how funny and inventive it was.”—Amy Gilmer, Pin Collective Lead
  • JOANN “Make to Give”: "The Studio team loved working with JOANN to launch 'Make to Give,' a campaign that used trending holiday insights to give back to charity. Customers who visited JOANN stores in November created Pinterest-inspired DIY ornaments. For every ornament created, JOANN donated $1 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. To inspire Pinners, we collaborated with Wit & Delight to create videos and static pins based on trending Pinterest DIY holiday decor."—Katrina Greenwood, Creative Strategist
  • Pinterest Secret Santa: “Pinterest Secret Santa showcases how data and APIs can transform a shopping experience through personalization. Pinterest knows its Pinners and it will tell you something that it knows they might want. We gave Pinners an intuitive way to find content to give more personal gifts to their friends.”—Arun Ranganathan, Creative Technologist
  • The Studio + Working Not Working “Right the Ratio”: “I loved the “Right the Ratio” work by The Studio and Working Not Working, which interviewed modern female creatives and provided actionable ideas for women in creative disciplines. Both inspired me to be more active about the cause here at Pinterest and in my personal life. The campaign pushed me to think differently about the issues going on with women in the workplace, and also helped me to become more confident and trust my intuition.”—Ally Weiss, Producer